Snow-White and the Seven Dwarfs: Randall Jarrell

Snow-White and the Seven Dwarfs: A Tale from the Brothers Grimm

Author/Illustrator: Randall Jarrell/Nancy Ekholm Burkert
Publisher:  Farrar, Straus, and Giroux
Publication Year: 1972
Brief Summary: A beautifully illustrated and translated version of Snow-White and the Seven Dwarfs.  
Awards, Honors and Prizes:

Ideas for using this book in classroom or library and/or brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core, etc.:

  • Discuss fairy tales and characteristics.
  • Read other versions.  Are there any similarities/differences between the different versions?  This version is quite dark…mentions cannibalism (the Queen eats the liver and lungs of Snow-White) and the Queen dies by dancing to death.  Might be better suited for older readers who are doing a fairy tale unit.

Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc.  

Accessed at: Capilano Library

Advertisements

Little Red Riding Hood: Trina Schart Hyman

 

Little Red Riding Hood

Author/Illustrator: Trina Schart Hyman
Publisher: Holiday House
Publication Year: 1983
Brief Summary: In this retelling of the classic fairytale, Elizabeth visits her sick grandmother, but encounters a wolf in the forest.
Awards, Honors and Prizes:

Golden Kite Award, 1984′ ‘ Award Book’ ‘ Picture Book Illustration’ ‘ United States’ ” ‘
New York Times Best Illustrated Children”s Books of the Year, 1991′ ‘ Winner’ ” ‘ United States’ ” ‘
Parents” Choice Award, 1983′ ‘ Gold’ ‘ Picture Books’ ‘ United States’ ” ‘
Parents” Choice Award, 2003′ ‘ Gold’ ‘ Best 25 Books in 25 Years’ ‘ United States’ ” ‘
Randolph Caldecott Medal, 1984′ ‘ Honor Book’ ” ‘ United States’ ” ‘

Ideas for using this book in classroom or library and/or brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core, etc.:

  • Discuss fairytales, definition and characteristics.  Read other versions (e.g. Lon Po Po or other fractured versions telling the story from the Wolf’s point of view) and compare/contrast the versions.
  • Once students understand fractured vs. traditional fairtales, ask which ones they prefer.  Have them practice writing their own fractured fairytales.

Accessed at: Vancouver Public Library

The Contest: Nonny Hogrogian

 The Contest: An Armenian Folktale

Author/Illustrator: Nonny Hogrogian
Publisher: Greenwillow Books
Publication Year: 1976
Brief Summary: In this Armenian folktale, two thieves try to outwit each other in order to win the heart of Ehleeza.
Awards, Honors and Prizes: 

Ideas for using this book in classroom or library and/or brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core, etc.:

  • Discuss folktales and its characteristics.  Read other folktales and see if students can pick out similar characteristics.
  • From the text, what can you tell about the main characters?  What are they like?

Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc. 

Accessed at: Thrasher Elementary Library

Rumpelstiltskin: Paul O. Zelinsky



Rumpelstiltskin

Author/Illustrator: Paul O. Zelinsky
Publisher: Dutton
Publication Year: 1986
Brief Summary:  A retelling of the classic folktale, Rumpelstiltskin, where a miller’s daughter is forced by the king to spin straw into gold.
Awards, Honors and Prizes:
Parents’ Choice Award, 1986 Gold Picture Books United States
Parents’ Choice Award, 2003 Gold Best 25 Books in 25 Years United States
Randolph Caldecott Medal, 1987 Honor Book United States
Redbook Children’s Picturebook Award, 1986 Winner United States

Best Books:
Children’s Catalog, Eighteenth Edition, 2001 ; H.W. Wilson
Children’s Catalog, Nineteenth Edition, 2006 ; H.W. Wilson
State Provisional Reading List: 
Texas Reading Club, 1999; Texas

Ideas for using this book in classroom or library:

  • Unit on folktales…how does this version compare to other versions?
  • Parts of the story: beginning, middle, end — younger kids can try to summarize the story; older kids can talk about how the author builds the suspense of the story to the climax.
  • Discussion of characterization: what do you think about the miller, the king, the daughter, and Rumpelstiltskin?
  • Have you ever made a deal with someone and regretted it?  If you met Rumpelstiltskin and he offered to help you with a wish, what would you do?
  • Can go over the origins of the story in the back of the book with older students.
  • How do the illustrations lend to the mood/tone for the story?

Brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core/etc.

  • Text-to-text connections
  • Text-to-self connections

Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc.: history of the story included in the back
Accessed at: Personal Library

Rapunzel: Paul O. Zelinsky


Rapunzel

Author/Illustrator: Paul O. Zelinsky
Publisher: Dutton
Publication Year: 1997
Brief Summary:  In this retelling of the classic folktale, Rapunzel is locked in a tower but falls in love with the prince who discovers her.  Beautiful and detailed illustrations.

Awards, Honors and Prizes:

ABC Children’s Booksellers Choices Award, 1998 Winner Folktales and Poetry United States
Cuffies: Children’s Booksellers Choose Their Favorite (and not-so-favorite) Books of the Year, 1997 Winner Best Bet to Win the Caldecott Medal United States
Randolph Caldecott Medal, 1998 Winner United States

Best Books:
Best Children’s Books of the Year, 1998 ; Bank Street College of Education
Booklist Book Review Stars, November 15, 1997 ; American Library Association
Books to Read Aloud to Children of All Ages, 2003 ; Bank Street College of Education
Bulletin Blue Ribbons, 1997 ; Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
Capitol Choices, 1997 ; The Capitol Choices Committee
Children’s Catalog, Eighteenth Edition, 2001 ; H.W. Wilson
Children’s Catalog, Nineteenth Edition, 2006 ; H.W. Wilson
Children’s Literature Choice List, 1998 ; Children’s Literature
Horn Book Fanfare, 1997 ; Horn Book
Los Angeles’ 100 Best Books, 1997 ; IRA Children’s Literature and Reading SIG and the Los Angeles Unified School District
Not Just for Children Anymore!, 1999 ; Children’s Book Council
Notable Children’s Books, 1998 ; ALSC American Library Association
Recommended Literature: Kindergarten through Grade Twelve, 2002 ; California Department of Education
School Library Journal Best Books, 1997 ; Cahners
School Library Journal Book Review Stars, November 1997 ; Cahners
State Provisional Reading List: 
Texas Reading Club, 1999; Texas

Ideas for using this book in classroom or library:

  • Unit on folktales…how does this version compare to other versions, including the Disney movie one?
  • Parts of the story: beginning, middle, end — younger kids can try to summarize the story; older kids can talk about how the author builds the suspense of the story to the climax.
  • Can go over the origins of the story in the back of the book with older students.
  • How do the illustrations lend to the mood/tone for the story?
  • Discussion about the characters: how would we characterize the parents, the witch, Rapunzel, and the prince?

Brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core/etc.

  • Text-to-text connections
  • Text-to-self connections

Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc.: history of the story included in the back
Accessed at: Personal Library