Hey, Al: Arthur Yorinks

Hey, Al

Author: Arthur Yorinks
Illustrator: Richard Egielski
Publisher: Farrar, Straus, Giroux
Publication Year: 1986
Brief Summary: When Al, a city janitor, and his dog complain about their impoverished living situation, a large bird offers to take them to a better place.  They enjoy the good life until strange things start happening…

Awards, Honors and Prizes:

 Ideas for using this book in classroom or library:
  • What does the phrase “Be careful what you wish for” mean?  Discuss how it relates to this book.
  • Al and his dog, Eddie, grumble about their life and think there’s something better out there.  What did they learn at the end?  Read It Could Always Be Worse by Margot Zemach.  What are some similarities/differences between the stories?

Brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core/etc.

  • Language arts
  • Text-to-text connections

Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc.
Accessed at:  Thrasher Elementary Library

Tuesday: David Wiesner


Tuesday  

  • Author/Illustrator: David Wiesner

  • Publisher: Clarion Books

  • Publication Year: 1991

  • Brief Summary: In this almost entirely wordless picture book, a group of frogs mysteriously travel through town on lilypads. Readers will enjoy studying the detailed illustrations and seeing the shocked faces of witnesses.

  • Awards (if any):

Awards, Honors and Prizes:

Best Books:

State and Provincial Reading List:

    • Introduce the concept of wordless picture books.  Why do you think the author choose to not include any words?  Read other wordless books such as Flotsam by David Wiesner and The Red Book by Barbara Lehman.  How is this wordless book different?
    • Have children tell the story based on looking at the pictures. Older students can write out their own version and share with the class.  Discuss how each story is different.
    • Spend time poring over the amazing pictures…what details can the students see?
    • Have students talk about their favorite day of the week.  Do they have a routine they follow?  What do they think might happen to the routine if something unexpected (like flying frogs) were to happen?  Write about it and illustrate.
  • Brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core/etc.:
    • Making inferences based on text/illustrations; making predictions
    • Text-to-self connections
  • Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc.: N/A

Accessed at: Personal Library

Where the Wild Things Are: Maurice Sendak

Where the Wild Things Are  

  • Author/Illustrator: Maurice Sendak

  • Publisher: Harper & Row

  • Publication Year: 1963

  • Brief Summary: When Max’s mother sent him to his room without supper, he sails off to the land of Wild Things and become their king.

  • Awards (if any):

Awards, Honors and Prizes:

Best Books:

State and Provincial Lists:

  • Ideas for using this book in classroom or library:

    • Read the book, then watch the Scholastic movie together

    • Ask the children: Have you ever been naughty and sent to your room?  What did you do while you were in there?  (Max daydreamed.)

    • Imagine that you are Max going on an adventure.  What kind of Wild Things will you meet?  Have children write about it with lots of small moments/details, and illustrate it.

  • Brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core/etc.

  • Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc.:

  • Accessed at: Personal Library

Jumanji: Chris Van Allsburg


Jumanji  

  • Author/Illustrator: Chris Van Allsburg

  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin

  • Publication Year: 1981

  • Brief Summary: Judy and Peter go on a surprising adventure when the board game they found comes to life and transforms the world around them into a jungle. They quickly realize that to survive the jungle’s many dangers (including a lion, wild monkeys, etc.), they need to finish the game.

  • Awards (if any):

Awards, Honors and Prizes:

  • Ideas for using this book in classroom or library:

    • Higher grades can watch the accompanying movie.  Are there many differences between the movie and the book?  Which does the children prefer?

    • Read Zathura, a sequel of sorts to Jumanji, except this time the game takes place in outer space.  If you can play a board game and have it come to life — what kind of game would it be?  Jungle, space, or something else?  (How about Candyland?  Chutes and Ladders?)

    • With your partner, make your own board game…what kind of adventures will you have the players go on?

    • If you were to write out the instructions for this game, what key steps would you include?

    • Make a timeline of important events

    • Imagine wild animals show up in your home, classroom, bedroom, your favorite restaurant, grandma’s house…write about your reactions and what you might do.

  • Brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core/etc.

    • Text-to-self connections

    • Math skills (counting in board games)

    • Writing instructions

    • Extrapolating important/main events; timeline

  • Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc.:  DVD of movie is available through Netflix

  • Accessed at: Thrasher Elementary Library