Museum Trip: Barbara Lehman

Museum Trip

Author/Illustrator: Barbara Lehman
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin
Publication Year: 2006
Brief Summary: In this wordless book, a boy explores the museum on his own and interacts with the exhibits.
Awards, Honors and Prizes:

Best Children’s Books of the Year, 2007 ; Bank Street College of Education
Booklist Book Review Stars , Apr. 15, 2006 ; American Library Association
Children’s Catalog, Nineteenth Edition, 2006 ; H.W. Wilson
Choices, 2007 ; Cooperative Children’s Book Center
Kirkus Book Review Stars, April 15, 2006
Publishers Weekly Book Review Stars, June 26, 2006 ; Cahners

Ideas for using this book in classroom or library and/or brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core, etc.:

  • Take a fieldtrip to the museum (virtual or real).  Pair with other books about famous museums, such as You Can’t Take a Balloon Into the Metropolitan Museum.
  • Print out mazes for the kids to do.

Accessed at: Thrasher Elementary Library

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We are in a Book: Mo Willems

We are in a Book

Author/Illustrator: Mo Willems
Publisher: Hyperion
Publication Year: 2010
Brief Summary: Elephant and Pig find out they are in a book and that someone is looking at them (the reader!).
Awards, Honors and Prizes:

Cybil Award, 2010′ ‘ Winner’ ” ‘ United States’ ” ‘
Great Lakes Great Books Award, 2011-2012′ ‘ Winner’ ‘ Grades K-1’ ‘ Michigan’ ” ‘
Theodor Seuss Geisel Award, 2011′ ‘ Honor Book’ ” ‘ United States’ ” ‘
A Baker’s Dozen: The Best Children’s Books for Family Literacy, 2011 ; Pennsylvania Center for the Book
Choices, 2011 ; Cooperative Children’s Book Center
Kirkus Best Children’s Books, 2010
Kirkus Book Review Stars, September 1, 2010
Notable Children’s Books in the English Language Arts, 2011 ; NCTE Children’s Literature Assembly
Notable Children’s Books, 2011 ; ALSC American Library Association
School Library Journal Best Books, 2010
School Library Journal Book Review Stars, December 2010 ; Cahners
School Library Journal Book Review Stars, January 2011 ; Cahners
School Library Journal Book Review Stars, November 2010 ; Cahners

Ideas for using this book in classroom or library and/or brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core, etc.:

  • Good for younger kids/reader theater
  • If you were in a book, what words would you make the reader say?
  • What kind of book would you want to be in? Choose your own adventure, travel, animal books, pirates, Star Wars/Ninjago, Where’s Waldo — Where’s [child’s name], etc.?  Write about it and illustrate a page out of your book.

Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc.   

Accessed at: Thrasher Elementary Library

The True Story of Three Little Pigs: Jon Scieszka

 

The True Story of Three Little Pigs

Author/Illustrator: Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith
Publisher: Viking
Publication Year: 1989
Brief Summary: The wolf tells his version of the story of the Three Little Pigs.

Awards, Honors and Prizes:

 Ideas for using this book in classroom or library and/or brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core, etc.:
  • Discuss fractured fairytales…how is this different/similar to the story of the Three Little Pigs that we are familiar with?
  • Who do you think it’s telling the truth?  How do you feel about the wolf after hearing his version?
  • Language Arts: discuss the concept of point of view…what does this mean? Why does it matter whose point of view the story is written in?

Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc. N/A

Accessed at: Thrasher Elementary Library

Press Here: Hervae Tullet

Press Here

Author/Illustrator: Hervae Tullet
Publisher: Chronicle Books
Publication Year: 2011
Brief Summary: This simple but innovative book invites readers to interact with the illustrations.  Wonderful things happen when children press, shake, tilt, and do other things with the book and its contents.

Awards, Honors and Prizes:

 Ideas for using this book in classroom or library and/or brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core, etc.:
  • Encourage students to play with the book.  What does this book remind you of?  (iPads, perhaps?)
  • Do you prefer reading a traditional book or books on iPads, Kindle, or other electronic formats?  Why?  Make a chart about the advantages and disadvantages of traditional/electronic books.
  • Discuss shapes and colors
  • Math – count the dots

Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc. N/A

Accessed at: B&N

The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales: Jon Scieszka




The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales 

Author: Jon Scieszka
Illustrator: Lane Smith
Publisher: Viking
Publication Year: 1992
Brief Summary: This tongue-in-cheek treatment of familiar fairy tales challenges what a picture book looks like.  Characters from different stories run amok and interact with one another, and endings are not always the ones we expect.

Awards, Honors and Prizes:
ABC Children’s Booksellers Choices Award, 1993 Winner Picture Books United States
Buckeye Children’s Book Award, 1995 Winner Grades K-2 Ohio
Colorado Children’s Book Award, 1994 Winner Picture Book Colorado
Flicker Tale Children’s Book Award, 1994 Winner Picture Book North Dakota
Georgia Children’s Book Award, 1997 Winner Georgia
M. Jerry Weiss Book Award, 1996 Winner Grades K-3 New Jersey
Maine Student Book Award, 1994 Winner Maine
New York Times Best Illustrated Children’s Books of the Year, 1992 Winner United States
North Carolina Children’s Book Award, 1994 Winner North Carolina
Parents’ Choice Award, 1992 Silver Story Books United States
Parents’ Choice Award, 2003 Best 25 Books in 25 Years United Statesundefined
Pennsylvania Young Readers’ Choice Award, 1994 Winner Grades 3-8 Pennsylvania
Randolph Caldecott Medal, 1993 Honor Book United States
Rhode Island Children’s Book Award, 1994 Winner Rhode Island
Texas Bluebonnet Award, 1995 Winner Texas

Best Books:

A Few Good Books, 1992 ; Book Links
Adventuring with Books: A Booklist for PreK-Grade 6, Tenth Edition, 1993 ; National Council of Teachers of English
Best Children’s Books, 1992 ; New York Times
Booklist Book Review Stars, Sept. 1, 1992 ; American Library Association
Booklist Editors’ Choice: Books for Youth, 1992 ; American Library Association
Bulletin Blue Ribbons, 1992 ; Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
Children’s Catalog, Eighteenth Edition, 2001 ; H.W. Wilson
Children’s Catalog, Nineteenth Edition, 2006 ; H.W. Wilson
Children’s Choices, 1993 ; International Reading Association
Horn Book Fanfare, 1992 ; Horn Book
Kirkus Book Review Stars, 1992
Lasting Connections, 1992 ; American Library Association
Not Just for Children Anymore!, 1998 ; Children’s Book Council
Not Just for Children Anymore!, 1999 ; Children’s Book Council
Notable Children’s Books, 1993 ; Association for Library Service to Children
School Library Journal Best Books, 1992 ; Cahners
School Library Journal: Best Books for Young Adults, 1992 ; Cahners
YALSA Best Books for Young Adults, 1993 ; American Library Association
YALSA Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults, 1997 ; American Library Association
YALSA Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers, 1993 ; American Library Association

State Provisional Reading List: 
Flicker Tale Children’s Book Award, 1994; Nominee
Maine Student Book Award, 1993-1994; Nominee

Ideas for using this book in classroom or library:

  • Discussion of fairy tales vs. fractured fairy tales.  What does it mean?  How are they similar/different?  How do the author/illustrators achieve this?  (Front matter of book is not as expected…the story starts on the end paper, etc.  Characters from one story appear in other stories, interrupt the narrator, etc.
  • Discuss point of view.  Do you believe the Wolf’s version of the story, for example?
  • Provide a writing prompt that is the beginning of a well-known fairytale.  Have the students write their own fractured versions.  Illustrate.  Share with their classmates.

Brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core/etc.

  • Writing
  • Language arts — what is point of view, etc.

Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc.
Accessed at: Personal Library

The Red Book: Barbara Lehman

The Red Book

  • Author/Illustrator: Barbara Lehman

  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin

  • Publication Year: 2004

  • Brief Summary: In this wordless book about a magical red book, friendship develops when one child picks it up and peeks inside.

  • Awards (if any):

Awards, Honors, and Prizes:

Best Books:

State and Provincial Reading List:

  • Ideas for using this book in classroom or library:

    • Introduce the concept of wordless picture books.  Why do you think the author choose to not include any words?  Read other wordless books, such as Tuesday or Flotsam.  How is this wordless book different/similar?

    • Have children tell the story based on looking at the pictures. Older students can write out their own version and share with the class.  Discuss how each story is different.

    • If you can enter any book, which book would you want to go into?  Why?

  • Brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core/etc.

    • Text-to-self connections

    • Read to write

  • Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc.: N/A

  • Accessed at: Thrasher Elementary Library

The Three Pigs: David Wiesner

The Three Pigs  

  • Author/Illustrator: David Wiesner

  • Publisher: Clarion Books

  • Publication Year: 2001

  • Brief Summary: The familiar story of the three little pigs and the big bad wolf takes a surprising turn when the wolf blows the first pig out of the story frame!  The second and third pigs follow and they meet other storybook characters along the way.

  • Awards (if any):

Awards, Honors and Prizes:

Best Books:

State and Provincial Lists:

  • Ideas for using this book in classroom or library:

    • What other storybook characters do you recognize?

    • Compare this with the original story of The Three Little Pigs, or something like Tell the Truth, B. B. Wolf, which also features characters from other well-known stories (Pinocchio, Gingerbread Boy).  What differences or similarities do you find between the stories?

    • Introduce the concept of fractured fairy tales; older students can try writing one using their favorite fairy tale

  • Brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core/etc.

    • Folktales/fairytales; fractured fairytales

  • Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc.: N/A

  • Accessed at: Personal Library