Truck: Donald Crews

Truck

Author/Illustrator: Donald Crews
Publisher: Greenwillow Books
Publication Year: 1980
Brief Summary: In this wordless book, readers follow a red truck on a cross-country journey.
Awards, Honors and Prizes:

Randolph Caldecott Medal, 1981′ ‘ Honor Book’ ” ‘ United States’ ” ‘

Ideas for using this book in classroom or library and/or brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core, etc.:

  • Talk about different types of vehicles/modes of transportation and their purposes.  What is the truck in the book used for?  Pair with Freight Train and other of Donald Crews’ books.
  • Talk about colors and shapes found in the book.
  • Discuss road safety — what types of safety features can you find in or out of the book?  (stop sign?  traffic light?  seatbelts?)

Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc.   

Accessed at: Thrasher Elementary Library

Free Fall: David Wiesner

Free Fall

Author/Illustrator: David Wiesner
Publisher: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Books
Publication Year: 1988
Brief Summary: A boy’s dreams take him to faraway places and fantastical lands and creatures.
Awards, Honors and Prizes:

Randolph Caldecott Medal, 1989′ ‘ Honor Book’ ” ‘ United States’ ‘
Children’s Catalog, Eighteenth Edition, 2001 ; H.W. Wilson
Children’s Catalog, Nineteenth Edition, 2006 ; H.W. Wilson

Ideas for using this book in classroom or library and/or brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core, etc.:

  • Discuss wordless books — have students take turns telling the story/describing the pictures.  Encourage them to be as detailed as they can.
  • Pay special attention to the last illustration of the book — what does it show us?  (Everything he met in the dream is in and around his bedroom.)
  • Have you had really fantastic dreams where you travel all over the places?  Do you like those kind of dreams?  Why or why not?  Pair with Where the Wild Things Are or other wordless books.  Have children describe what they see in each picture.

Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc.   

Accessed at: Thrasher Elementary Library

A Ball for Daisy: Chris Raschka

A Ball for Daisy

Author/Illustrator: Chris Raschka
Publisher: Schwartz & Wade Books
Publication Year: 2011
Brief Summary: A wordless book whereDaisy loves her red ball and plays with it all the time until it pops.  What will she do for fun now?
Awards, Honors and Prizes:

New York Times Best Illustrated Children”s Books, 2011′ ” ” ‘ United States’ ” ‘undefined
Randolph Caldecott Medal, 2012′ ‘ Winner’ ” ‘ United States’ ” ‘
Best Children’s Books of the Year, 2012 ; Bank Street College of Education
Choices, 2012 ; Cooperative Children’s Book Center
Horn Book Fanfare, 2011 ; Horn Book
New York Public Library’s 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing, 2011 ; New York Public Library
Notable Children’s Books, 2012 ; ALSC American Library Association
School Library Journal Best Books, 2011
School Library Journal Book Review Stars, August 2011 ; Cahners

Ideas for using this book in classroom or library and/or brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core, etc.:

  • Art: discuss style of painting for the book
  • Discuss wordless books.  Have students narrate the book or write their own.  Compare how students’ stories are different.  Read other wordless books such as Tuesday or Flotsam. Do the kids like wordless books?

Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc. 

Accessed at: Thrasher Elementary Library

Tuesday: David Wiesner


Tuesday  

  • Author/Illustrator: David Wiesner

  • Publisher: Clarion Books

  • Publication Year: 1991

  • Brief Summary: In this almost entirely wordless picture book, a group of frogs mysteriously travel through town on lilypads. Readers will enjoy studying the detailed illustrations and seeing the shocked faces of witnesses.

  • Awards (if any):

Awards, Honors and Prizes:

Best Books:

State and Provincial Reading List:

    • Introduce the concept of wordless picture books.  Why do you think the author choose to not include any words?  Read other wordless books such as Flotsam by David Wiesner and The Red Book by Barbara Lehman.  How is this wordless book different?
    • Have children tell the story based on looking at the pictures. Older students can write out their own version and share with the class.  Discuss how each story is different.
    • Spend time poring over the amazing pictures…what details can the students see?
    • Have students talk about their favorite day of the week.  Do they have a routine they follow?  What do they think might happen to the routine if something unexpected (like flying frogs) were to happen?  Write about it and illustrate.
  • Brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core/etc.:
    • Making inferences based on text/illustrations; making predictions
    • Text-to-self connections
  • Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc.: N/A

Accessed at: Personal Library

Flotsam: David Wiesner

Flotsam  

  • Author/Illustrator: David Wiesner

  • Publisher: Clarion Books

  • Publication Year: 2006

  • Brief Summary: In this wordless story, a boy finds an underwater camera on the beach.  The pictures he finds after developing the film take him on a fantastic journey to the depths of the sea and other children who had gone before him.

  • Awards (if any):

Awards, Honors and Prizes:

Best Books:

State and Provincial Lists:

  • Ideas for using this book in classroom or library:

    • Introduce the concept of wordless picture books.  Why do you think the author choose to not include any words?  Read The Red Book by Barbara Lehman.  How is this wordless book different?

    • Have children tell the story based on looking at the pictures. Older students can write out their own version and share with the class.  Discuss how each story is different.

    • Spend time poring over the amazing pictures…what details can the students see?

    • Have students create their own fantastical/imaginary creatures — in the ocean or any other habitat.

    • A Picture a Day — Give students (or have parents provide) disposable cameras and have them take one interesting picture a day for [a week, 2 weeks, a month]…something that touched them, something that made them laugh/cry/scared/mad.  Have them share their prints with the class at the end of the unit.

  • Brief notes on curriculum connections/content learning standards/Common Core/etc.

  • Special features included (if applicable) — index; timeline; author’s notes; further reading; etc.: N/A

  • Accessed at: Personal Library